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Curriculum

There are two tracks in this program.

Track I (Students in the M.Arch. Degree)

The certificate requires 12–15 credits of coursework as outlined below. Note that classes required by the degree program have preservation and/or historic content, but only those taken in addition to required core or restricted elective/“selective” courses count towards the 12–15 certificate credits, though certificate credits may count as free electives toward total degree credits.

This means, for example, that if you take Arch 538 to meet your required graduate seminar, you will need to take additional credits toward the certificate.

Track I students wishing to qualify for the Certificate in Historic Preservation follow the established M. Arch. program, including:

  • Arch 500 Design Studio on Architecture in an Urban and Historic Context

  • Arch 590 Urban and Preservation Issues in Design

  • One 503, 504, 505, or 506 studio that includes a component of preservation design or design in an historic context.

The 12–15 credits of preservation-related coursework should include:

  • Arch 579 Technical Issues in Preservation (offered alternate years)

  • Case Studies (either 1 of these 2 courses):

    • Arch 538 Building Reuse Seminar: Investigating the Value of Existing Buildings
    • UrbDP 587 Preservation and the Vernacular Environment

  • Preservation Planning (either 1 of these 2 courses):

    • UrbDP 585 Introduction to Historic Preservation Planning
    • UrbDP 586 Implementation in Preservation Planning

  • Strongly Recommended:

      Arch 598 History & Theory of Historic Preservation (offered alternate years)

  • Architectural History (choose courses to complete the 12–15 credits):

    • Arch 452 History of Architecture in Seattle and Environs
    • Arch 455 American Architectural History
    • Arch 456 Nineteenth-Century Architecture
    • Arch 457 Twentieth-Century Architecture
    • Arch 459 Architecture Since 1945
    • Arch 537 Traditional Building Methods: New Adaptations
    • Arch 538 Building Reuse Seminar: Investigating the Value of Existing Buildings
    • Arch 555 Seminar in American Architecture
    • Arch 556 The Arts & Crafts Movement and Its Legacies
    • Arch 559 American Utilitarian Architecture
    • Arch 598 History & Theory of Historic Preservation
    • L Arch 450 History of Environmental Design in the Pacific Northwest
    • L Arch 451 History of Environmental Design on the West Coast
    • L Arch 454 History of Urban Landscapes and Environments
    • L Arch 552 History Landscape Architecture
    • L Arch 553 History of Modern Landscape Architecture
    • UrbDP 479 The Urban Form
    • UrbDP 564 Planning History, Theory and Ethics
    • UrbDP 565 American Urban History
    • UrbDP 585 Introduction to Preservation Planning
    • UrbDP 586 Implementation of Preservation
    • UrbDP 587 Preservation and the Vernacular Environment
  • Please check with the advising office if you wish to count a course not listed here toward the certificate.

    Thesis

    Completion of a thesis is a requirement to receive the professional M. Arch. degree. Specific requirements for the thesis are available from the Graduate Program Coordinator of the Department of Architecture. M. Arch. candidates wishing to receive the Historic Preservation Certificate must select a thesis topic with content in the area of preservation design or related issues in historic preservation, and the thesis committee must be chaired by a member of the Historic Preservation faculty, or if they have an assigned thesis studio director, have an advisor from the History Preservation program faculty who will be responsible for guidance on this portion of their thesis.

Track II (Students in the B.L.A., M.L.A., M.S. in Arch. History/Theory, M.U.P., or Ph.D. Degree Programs)

Track II students wishing to qualify for the Certificate in Historic Preservation follow their established degree program, including required history courses. We also ask that for one of the studios required for their degree (for those degrees that require them), students choose one with a preservation component (such studios are listed each quarter on the list circulated to students).

In addition, to receive the certificate students must take 12–15 credits of preservation-related coursework which may not overlap with degree requirements (including "selectives"—for example, if M.U.P. students take UrbDP 586 for their Advanced Methods Requirement for the M.U.P. those credits do not count toward certificate credits) though certificate credits may count toward elective credits and the total number of credits required by the degree.

These 12–15 credits should include:

  • UrbDP 585 Introduction to Historic Preservation Planning
  • UrbDP 586 Implementation in Preservation Planning
  • One advanced seminar in preservation:

    • Arch 538 Building Reuse Seminar: Investigating the Value of Existing Buildings
    • Arch 598 History & Theory of Historic Preservation (offered alternate years)
    • UrbDP 587 Preservation and the Vernacular Environment
  • Further coursework in architectural, landscape, or urban history to a total of 12–15 credits.

    Suggested courses include:

    • Arch 452 History of Architecture in Seattle and Environs
    • Arch 455 American Architectural History
    • Arch 456 Nineteenth-Century Architecture
    • Arch 457 Twentieth-Century Architecture
    • Arch 459 Architecture Since 1945
    • Arch 537 Traditional Building Methods: New Adaptations
    • Arch 538 Building Reuse Seminar: Investigating the Value of Existing Buildings
    • Arch 555 Seminar in American Architecture
    • Arch 556 The Arts & Crafts Movement and Its Legacies
    • Arch 559 American Utilitarian Architecture
    • Technical Issues in Preservation
    • L Arch 352/552 History and Theory of Landscape Architecture
    • L Arch 353/553 History and Theory of Modern Landscape Architecture
    • L Arch 450 History of Environmental Design in the Pacific Northwest
    • L Arch 451 History of Environmental Design on the West Coast
    • L Arch 454 History of Urban Landscapes and Environments
    • UrbDP 479 The Urban Form
    • UrbDP 564 Planning History, Theory and Ethics
    • UrbDP 565 American Urban History
    • HIST (History) and HSTAA (History of the Americas) courses may also be taken to meet these requirements, as may other courses in the university
  • Thesis/Capstone/Professional Project

    Completion of a thesis, capstone, or professional project with a preservation component is a requirement of the certificate. Candidates wishing to receive the Historic Preservation Certificate must select a topic with some content in the area of preservation planning and design or related issues in historic preservation, and their committee must be chaired by a member of the Historic Preservation faculty, or if they have an assigned thesis studio director, have an advisor from the History Preservation program faculty who will be responsible for guidance on this portion of their thesis.